Rotary Club of Homer-Kachemak Bay

 

 

Club Information

Welcome to the Rotary Club of Homer-Kachemak Bay - Celebrating Over 30 Years Serving Homer and Abroad

Homer-Kachemak Bay

Four Way Test: True, Fair, Goodwill & Beneficial to All

We meet Thursdays at 12:00 PM
Best Western Bidarka Inn
575 Sterling Hwy
PO Box 377
Homer, AK  99603
United States
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Home Page Stories
Some picture of the Homer portion of the Open World Visitors trip.  A really interesting and interested group.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Bye, bye!
 

 

Ravindran moves audience with personal story

RI President K.R. Ravindran shares a personal story of triumph over polio at the closing session of the 107th Rotary convention.
Photo Credit: SJ Cho

RI President K.R. Ravindran closed the convention in Korea on Wednesday, 1 June, with a poignant story about his mother's fight to survive polio at age 30.

When Ravindran was 11 years old in his native Sri Lanka, his mother awoke one day feeling weak and short of breath. Sitting down to rest, she found herself unable to move. The polio virus had quickly invaded her nervous system, resulting in paralysis.

She was placed in an iron lung at the hospital to enable her to breathe, and was told that her chances of walking, or even surviving without a ventilator, were slim. But most Sri Lankan hospitals were not equipped with ventilators in 1963.

Ravindran's grandfather, a Rotary member, hosted a club committee meeting in his living room the evening after his daughter was rushed to the hospital. Rather than simply offer consolation, his fellow members went to work, using their business acumen and professional connections to find a ventilator.

One of the members was a bank manager who called a government minister to facilitate a quick international transfer of funds. Another member, a manager at SwissAir, arranged to have a ventilator flown in. The next day, it arrived at the hospital.

"There was so much red tape at the time in Sri Lanka, but somehow, those Rotarians made it all fall away," Ravindran told the packed audience at the KINTEX Convention Center in Goyang city.

Ravindran's mother spent a year-and-a-half in a hospital bed, but her condition gradually improved. She eventually left the hospital walking -- with a walker, but upright, on her own two feet.

"Fifty-three years ago, my mother's life was perhaps one of the very first to be saved from polio by Rotarians," Ravindran said. "We have saved millions of lives since then.

"Tonight, I stand before you as her son, and your president, to say that soon -- perhaps not in years but in months -- Rotary will give a gift that will endure forever: a world without polio."

At the convention's general session the day before, Rebecca Martin, director of the Center for Global Health at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, had . Earlier that day, Rotary released an additional $35 million in grants to support global efforts to end the crippling disease.

This year's convention, one of the largest in Rotary history, attracted more than 43,000 attendees from over 150 countries. Ravindran, in his final speech to members as their president, emphasized what it really means to be a Rotarian.

"There are people on this planet whose lives are better now because you traversed this earth," he said. "And it doesn't matter if they know that or not. It doesn't matter if they even know your name or not. What really matters is that your work touched lives; that it left people healthier, happier, better than they were before."

Looking ahead to next year

Following Ravindran's remarks, members of Ravindran's Rotary Club of Colombo, Sri Lanka, and RI President-elect John Germ's Rotary Club of Chattanooga, Tennessee, USA, took the stage to exchange club banners, a tradition that unofficially marks the changing of the guard.

Germ told the audience that Rotary is about to begin the most progressive year in its history.

"You told us that we need to change and become more flexible so that Rotary service will be attractive to younger members, recent retirees, and working people," Germ said. "You spoke with clarity, and groundbreaking legislation was passed this year at the Council on Legislation.

"Clubs now have the opportunity to be who they want to be, but at the same time remain true to our core. I'm pleased to share with you that Rotarians all over the world are responding with great excitement."

1-Jun-2016
 

 
Milli Martin, Susie Quinn, Dee Clyne, and Dave Brann worked on the planters for Ben Walters Park this last week.  Looking Good!
 
 
 Milli Martin and Susie Quinn working on flowers for Ben Walters Park.
 

 
Our Outbound Youth Exchange Students, Summer McGuire and Alex Miller, accepting a certificate acknowledging a donation being made in their name (as our weekly speakers) to Haven House.  Although Summer is from Homer, the Seward Rotary Club is sponsoring her Youth Exchange visit.
 
 

 

What millennials love about Rotary

From left: Christa Papavasiliou, Jermaine Ee, and Yvonne Kwan.

From the of The Rotarian

If there is one absolute truth about millennials, it is this: Anyone who says there is an absolute truth about millennials risks being subjected to their collective eye roll.

Millennials are individuals, and fiercely so. According to the Pew Research Center, most of them don’t even like being called “millennials,” let alone hearing generalizations about their shared attitudes and behaviors.

Case in point: Christa Papavasiliou, 31, recoils at the notion that older folks see her generation as a bunch of selfie-snapping smartphone addicts. “I’m the complete opposite,” says Papavasiliou, who was a Boston Rotaract club president and district Rotaract representative before joining a Rotary club, the E-Club of New England, last year. “How would they like it if I stereotyped them?”

It’s a fair question. And yet, it seems we can’t help ourselves.

The U.S. Census Bureau defines millennials as Americans born between 1982 and 2000, which puts their overall numbers around 83.1 million. That means there are more of them than any other age group – including baby boomers, who totaled 78.8 million at their peak and now number 75.4 million. As millennials become the dominant demographic in our communities, the rest of us strive to better understand them in order to improve our relationships in the workplace and beyond.

For Rotary, the millennial era could mean an influx of young, energetic members. The percentage of Rotarians under 40 has remained fairly steady at about 10 percent in recent years, but this could be the generation that bucks the trend.

The Pew Research Center has found that millennials do tend to share certain traits. A 2014 report characterized them as “unattached to organized politics and religion, linked by social media, burdened by debt, distrustful of people, in no rush to marry – and optimistic about the future.” Millennials are also the most ethnically diverse age group and the first generation of digital natives. And, yes, more than half of them have shared a selfie.

They also feel compelled to make a difference in their communities. The Case Foundation’s 2015 Millennial Impact Research Report found that 84 percent of the millennials surveyed had made a charitable donation the previous year and that 70 percent had spent at least an hour volunteering.

What does that mean for Rotary? Papavasiliou may be reluctant to speak for her generation, but she nevertheless represents their drive to make an impact.

In college, she was drawn to Rotaract because of the service opportunities. The desire to serve is what carried her to International Rotary Youth Leadership Awards and got her “completely hooked” on Rotary. It’s what inspired her to charter a Rotaract club near her hometown and to join the Boston club when she moved. “There’s a real beauty to the underlying message of Service Above Self,” she says. “That’s how I acquire all of my friends in a new city. I know there are going to be people in Rotary who are like-minded and like-hearted.”

One such friend is 24-year-old Jermaine Ee, who became the youngest member of the Rotary Club of Los Angeles when he joined last August. Before joining “LA5,” he was a Rotaract club president at the University of Southern California, where he also served as district representative. He and Papavasiliou met at a Rotary event.

“The truth is, Rotary has everything millennials want,” Ee says. Among other things, it offers an opportunity to unplug every once in a while and connect with people who share their values, if not their age demographic, he says.

As a young professional who is surrounded by tech entrepreneurs, Ee is drawn to Rotary’s in-person interactions and “old school” traditions. “People talk about the Friday lunches that take time out of my schedule,” he says. “I love them. Among my peers, there is a lack of this formality.”

He also appreciates the opportunity to develop relationships with people who have more life experience than he does. “My older Rotarian friends and mentors never fail to help me put things in perspective,” he says. And their mentorship isn’t just about business; they have helped him navigate some of adulthood’s subtler skills: “drinking Scotch, planning a day at the racetrack, understanding how to place people on a seating chart.”

In return, Ee likes to coach older Rotarians in mysteries such as how to use social media. As co-founder of a digital marketing agency, Ee bridges the generation gap at work every day. “I sell Snapchat to 60-year-old executives,” he says. “It doesn’t get more resistant than that.”

He often tells his older clients that they are more skilled at social media than they think. “You know how to care about someone; you remember what they like to eat; you remember that their daughter had a ballet competition,” he reminds them. “You care about things. You just don’t know how to do it on a platform.”

In contrast, he says, many younger people “know how to use the tools, but they don’t know how to do the relationship building.”

Ee considers it his responsibility as a young Rotarian to help facilitate intergenerational conversations. His first pointer: It’s not about your membership numbers. “We invest a lot in intent,” he says of his peers. “So when a 60-something Rotarian talks to a 21-year-old, if that person’s intent is to just get another line on the roster, that intent is seen really quickly.”

He suggests that clubs seek out ways to encourage dialogue. “Millennials are curious,” he says, “and Rotarians in general have a lot of interesting stories.” It seems like a natural fit, but younger members can feel intimidated by the older adults in the room, and longtime members can get so comfortable in their social routines that they forget to mingle.

While Rotary may be a great ideological fit for millennials, it can present logistical challenges for young people who aren’t settled enough in their professional and personal lives to commit to regular meeting attendance.

That’s the problem that the founders of the E-Club of Silicon Valley set out to solve when they established their club last year. “It was very much a conversation of how we can get people into Rotary who want to be a part of Rotary but always come up with the response of, ‘I don’t have the time,’” says 25-year-old charter member Yvonne Kwan. “These are people who want to do good. They want to help out. They want to give back to the community, but they just can’t make it out to the meetings every single week at a certain time.”

Kwan’s club posts its meetings online for members to “attend” at any time during the week. The club also hosts regular social gatherings – potlucks, happy hours, and, most recently, a hike in a natural area north of San Francisco. “We went out into nature, and we took a few hours and hiked up to Point Reyes,” she says. “It was beautiful.”

When members go online for meetings, they find engaging content, Kwan says. “We’ve made our meetings very visual-heavy with videos, pictures, a font that’s easy to read.”

In addition to the standard Rotary business items, the e-club meetings feature videos of speakers from all over the world and a weekly “tech tidbit or life hack” that members may find useful or entertaining. Kwan recently posted a tip about a discovery she made when she temporarily lost her Internet connection: The Chrome browser has a game hidden in its connection error page. “It was the highlight of my day for that very treacherous time when I had no Internet,” she jokes. So she made a short video about it and shared it with the club.

Another difference between Kwan’s club and others: “We don’t have big service projects that we do as a club because we’re dispersed throughout the world,” she says. Instead, members are encouraged to partner with other Rotary clubs or nonprofit organizations, find their own opportunities, and report them to the club as service. “You can do your own service in your own time,” Kwan says. “It gives people more power to adjust their own schedules.”

Though the e-club’s meetings are online, Kwan considers the in-person interactions to be just as important. She usually invites potential members to a social event before they ever see an online meeting. “It draws them in and it piques their interest, and you get to know them a little bit more,” she says. “I think that’s really valuable. Millennials are looking for a place to give back to their community, but they need to feel like they are getting value as well.”

Ee, of the Los Angeles club, agrees. “It doesn’t matter how bad my week was. I always end it with Rotary, and I always leave with a little more good faith in humanity,” he says. “I’m really excited for the next 20 years – to see where Rotary’s going to go.”

Kim Lisagor is a freelance writer and co-author of Disappearing Destinations: 37 Places in Peril and What Can Be Done to Help Save Them.

The Rotarian

1-May-2016
 

 
 
 
 
Homer-Kachemak Bay Rotary Club President, Craig Forrest, presents six $1000 Academic Scholarships to the graduating Seniors at Homer High School May 9, 2016.
 
 
 
 

 
 

Council grants clubs greater flexibility in meeting, membership

Council member Dominque Dubois holds up a green card to indicate support of a motion while Sandeep Nurang ponders his response during the 2016 Council on Legislation.
Photo Credit: Monika Lozinska.

The 2016 Council on Legislation may well be remembered as one of the most progressive in Rotary history.

Not only did this Council grant clubs more freedom in determining their meeting schedule and membership, it also approved an increase in per capita dues of $4 a year for three years. The increase will be used to enhance Rotary’s website, improve online tools, and add programs and services to help clubs increase membership.

The Council is an essential element of Rotary’s governance. Every three years, members from around the world gather in Chicago to consider proposed changes to the policies that govern the organization and its member clubs. Measures that are adopted take effect 1 July.

The tone for this year was set early, when the RI Board put forth two proposals that increase flexibility. The first measure allows clubs to decide to vary their meeting times, whether to meet online or in person, and when to cancel a meeting, as long as they meet at least twice a month. The second allows clubs flexibility in choosing their membership rules and requirements. Both passed.

Representatives also approved removing six membership criteria from the RI Constitution and replacing them with a simple requirement that a member be a person of good character who has a good reputation in their business or community and is willing to serve the community.

The $4 per year dues increase was based on a five-year financial forecast that predicted that if Rotary didn’t either raise dues or make drastic cuts, its reserves would dip below mandated levels by 2020. The yearly per capita dues that clubs pay to RI will be $60 in 2017-18, $64 in 2018-19, and $68 in 2019-20. The next council will establish the rate after that.

“We are at a moment in time when we must think beyond the status quo,” said RI Vice President Greg E. Podd. “We must think about our future.”

Podd said the dues increase will allow RI to improve My Rotary, develop resources so clubs can offer a better membership experience, simplify club and district reporting, improve website access for Rotaractors, and update systems to keep Rotary in compliance with changing global regulations.

Also because of this Council’s decisions:

  • A Council on Resolutions will meet annually online to consider resolutions — recommendations to the RI Board. Council members will be selected for three-year terms. They’ll participate in the Council on Resolutions for three years and the Council on Legislation in their final year only. The Council on Resolutions will free the Council on Legislation to concentrate on enactments — changes to Rotary’s governing documents. Proponents predict that the Council on Legislation can then be shortened by a day, saving $300,000.
  • Rotaractors will be allowed to become members of Rotary clubs while they are still in Rotaract. Proponents argued that too few Rotaractors (around 5 percent) join Rotary. Sometimes it’s because they don’t want to leave their Rotaract clubs before they have to, upon reaching age 30. It’s hoped that giving them more options will boost the numbers of qualified young leaders in Rotary.
  • The distinction between e-clubs and traditional clubs will be eliminated. The Council recognized that clubs have been meeting in a number of ways, and given this flexibility, the distinction was no longer meaningful. Clubs that have “e-club” in their names can keep it, however.
  • The reference to admission fees will be removed from the bylaws. Proponents argued that the mention of admission fees does not advance a modern image of Rotary.
  • A standing committee on membership was established, in recognition that membership is a top priority of the organization, and polio eradication was also reaffirmed to be a goal of the highest order.

Learn more about the

Rotary News

18-Apr-2016
 

 

Our Structure

Rotary is made up of three parts: at the heart of Rotary are our clubs, that are supported by Rotary International and The Rotary Foundation.

Rotary clubs bring together dedicated individuals to exchange ideas, build relationships, and take action.

Rotary International supports Rotary clubs worldwide by coordinating global programs, campaigns, and initiatives.

The Rotary Foundation uses generous donations to fund projects by Rotarians and our partners in communities around the world. As a nonprofit, all of the Foundation's funding comes from voluntary contributions made by Rotarians and friends who share our vision of a better world.

Together, Rotary clubs, Rotary International, and The Rotary Foundation work to make lasting improvements in our communities and around the world.

 

 
 
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John Germ selected as 2016-17 Rotary president

 

(Next time he attends our District Conference maybe we can get him on the zipline too!)

John F. Germ, a member of the Rotary Club of Chattanooga, Tennessee, USA, and chair of the International PolioPlus Committee, is the selection of the Nominating Committee for President of RI in 2016-17. He will become the president-nominee on 1 October if there are no challenging candidates.

For Rotary to thrive, Germ says, members must face current and future challenges and opportunities with "passion, enthusiasm, perseverance, and above all, integrity."

"I envision Rotary boldly and creatively engaging the success of polio eradication, membership and identity issues, strengthening clubs, work with youth – our future lifeblood, and the creation of critical, strategic partnerships," says Germ. "The 2016-17 Rotary year offers a tremendous opportunity for Rotary International and the Foundation partnership unified and thriving, on all levels, via the six areas of focus."

Germ says no one should ever have to ask, "What is Rotary?"

"We will enhance Rotary's public image by successfully and enthusiastically marketing who we are, what amazing things we are doing, and incredibly, have done locally and globally," says Germ.

With the global economy still unpredictable, Germ says Rotary must make participation affordable and "also be unfailingly diligent in efforts to ensure we spend every dollar effectively and efficiently," he says.

In 1965, after four years in the U.S. Air Force, Germ, an engineer, joined Campbell and Associates Inc., an engineering consulting firm. He now serves as the company's board chair and chief executive officer.

He also serves on the boards of several organizations including the Public Education Foundation, Orange Grove Center Inc., and the Blood Assurance Inc. He is the founder and treasurer of the Chattanooga State Technical Community College Foundation and is president of the Tennessee Jaycee Foundation.

In 1970 he was recognized as Tennessee Young Man of the Year, Engineer of the Year, and Volunteer Fundraiser of the Year in 1992.

A Rotary member since 1976, Germ has served Rotary as vice president, director, Foundation trustee and vice chair, chair of Rotary's US$200 Million Challenge, and RI president's aide. He is a recipient of Rotary's Service Above Self Award and The Rotary Foundation's Citation for Meritorious Service and Distinguished Service Award. He and his wife, Judy, are members of the Arch Klumph Society.

"Rotary will adapt to a rapidly changing world by embracing innovation within the guidelines of our tradition and values," says Germ. "By aggressively embracing new technologies, social media, and new opportunities, individuals and businesses will see that Rotary helps promote a good civic and public image while adding credibility to their people."

- See more at: http://rotarydistrict5010.org/Stories/john-germ-selected-2016-17-rotary-president#sthash.5gmVmJYM.dpuf
 

 
 
An unsolicited letter from one of our past Exchange Students, Lily Westphal!
 
 
 
 
Speakers
Jul 07, 2016
Anna Raupp and Kayla Spaan
Kundalini Yoga and Its Benefits
Jul 14, 2016
Liz Hagerman
Dance Therapy
Jul 21, 2016
Kelly Cline
NASA's Dawn Mission: Exploring the Astroid Belt
Jul 28, 2016
Nancy Dodge
Shelter Boxes
Aug 04, 2016
Samantha Cunningham
Defibrillators
Aug 11, 2016
Josh Brann
World Environmental Projects
Aug 18, 2016
RYLA Students
RYLA 2016
Aug 25, 2016
Tom Early
Club Assembly
Sep 01, 2016
Sep 08, 2016
Bob Hartley
Port and Harbor
Sep 22, 2016
Sep 29, 2016
Oct 06, 2016
Oct 13, 2016
Tom Early
Club Assembly
Oct 20, 2016
Christie Griffard
Inbound Exchange Student
Oct 27, 2016
Oct 27, 2016
 
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